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Existing Land Use and Land Use Trends - Official Website of the City Government of Ligao

Existing Land Use and Land Use Trends

Existing General Land Use

Overall City Structure

For administrative purposes, the LGU subdivided the City into four units according to geographical commonality.  The Mayon Unit comprising the northern barangays is defined by its proximity to Mayon Volcano and is thus a relatively environmentally sensitive area.  The Central Unit covers the City’s flatlands and is the location of its large rice producing areas as well as its Poblacion.  The Upland Unit is at the City’s central portion and is characterized by rolling hills and high elevations.  The Coastal Unit is, in turn located at the City’s southern end and mainly borders Panganiban Bay. Such a structure has defined the location of the City’s prime agricultural areas which are shown in Figure 1.1 while its land cover is presented in Figure 1.2.

The overall city structure may be defined by the configuration of its major road network as well as by centers of activities.  The City has an urban core which is Poblacion and vicinity complemented by a secondary node which is Barangay Paulba.  The urban core is the hub of the City’s urban functions and services, being the seat of government, education, commerce and finance. This urban core has intra-City and inter-LGU functions inasmuch as it is capable of servicing not only the requirements of Ligao residents but those of adjacent municipalities as well.  Its growth follows an east-west direction along the National Road.  It is also growing towards the north, though at a much lesser pace since properties do not have the same level of accessibility and visibility as those along the National Road. The urban core is ringed by prime agricultural lands which tend to hem-in its outward expansion.  Based on the number of facilities observed from the InfRES survey, the center of the urban core is apparently moving towards Barangay Tuburan.

Other minor nodes may be identified based on centrality measures based on location and the number and types of facilities as can be observed from the results of the same survey.  

Paulba 15 km away from the urban center, has emerged as a distinct secondary node due to its strategic crossroads location in the Upland Unit.  This secondary node mainly services the central upland barangays. Its significance is highlighted by its having the most number of basic facilities among all the rural barangays in the City. Barangay Paulba is considered as the nucleus of trade and commerce in the cluster of upland barangays.

A significant intervention which the LGU introduced in the Upland Unit is the establishment of a mini economic, trading and commercial zone.  Located in Sitio Managanaga in Barangay Busac, the eco-zone (or trade zone) is geared to promote diversified livelihood among residents.  This innovative strategy was borne out of the need to discourage upland residents to sympathize with the revolutionary movement.

The other barangay centers serve as satellite nodes and rely on the higher order services available in the urban core and secondary node.  The southern barangays comprising the Coastal Unit have distinct characters of their own.  Due to their relative distance from the urban core, these have retained their indigenous Filipino “barrio” character.  These are characterized by quaint nipa huts, bamboo fences and pedestrian-scale roads set amidst lush tropical greenery and turquoise waters of the adjoining bay.  Barangay Maonon is a minor node in this unit.

The completion of the InfRES road connecting Abella to Maonon is expected to facilitate the development of the southern part of the Upland Unit and the entire Coastal Unit.  Direct access to Barangay Paulba and hence to Poblacion will be facilitated instead of the circuitous route through Pio Duran.  This development is expected to enliven trade and commerce in these areas.

The northern barangays ha ve Barangay Amtic which has emerge d as Mayon Unit’s minor node hosting, among others, a high school, three chapels and three multi-purpose pavements.  Barangay Herrera closely follows Amtic in terms of number of facilities.  Its advantage lies in it being in a more accessible and less environmentally sensitive location. 

The City’s overall structure is presented in Figure 1.3.

 

Existing General Land Use Allocation

The existing general land use allocation (2007) is presented in the following table while the existing general land use map is presented in Figure 1.4.

Table 1.5 Breakdown of Existing General Land Use, 2007

Land Use Category

Area (has)

Share to Total City Area

Agricultural

20,612.02

83.65%

Built-Up

539.69

2.19%

Forest

2,650.30

10.76%

Lake

2.39

0.01%

PNR Right of Way

14.32

0.06%

Road

260.75

1.06%

River

547.35

2.22%

Dumpsite

5.00

0.02%

Mangrove

8.18

0.03%

Total

24,640.00

100.00%

Source: Parcellary Data

 

Existing Urban Land Use

Urban Structure

The urban structure (Figure 1.5) is accentuated by a series of nodes defined primarily by the crossroads of the old alignment of the National Road and the Diversion Road as well as by the urban center.  The latter is a relatively extensive stretch which is discernible from the City Hall onto the Public Market.  Several landmarks may be found within the urban center such as the old church and plaza, multi-purpose area and the City park.  The urban center can further be characterized by districts – government, business and residential.  The edges of the urban area are defined by prime agricultural lands.  A grid pattern of streets provide a frame to the City’s urban structure.

 

Existing Urban Land Use Allocation

The urban land use allocation (2007) is presented in the following table while the existing urban land use map is presented in Figure 1.6.

 

Table 1.6 Breakdown of Existing Urban Land Use, 2007

Land Use Category

Area (has)

Share to Total Urban Area

Agricultural

909.09

71.64%

Residential

220.13

17.35%

Road

37.00

2.92%

Commercial

11.87

0.94%

River

44.86

3.53%

Parks and Recreation

1.84

0.15%

Cemetery

1.76

0.14%

Vacant/Idle Lands

5.15

0.41%

Institutional

15.00

1.18%

Railroad

17.59

1.39%

Agro-Industrial

0.23

0.02%

Utility

4.43

0.35%

Total

1,268.95

100.00%

 

Land Use Plan, 2000 – 2004

Proposed General Land Use Plan, 2000 – 2004

The breakdown of previously proposed general land uses for 2000 – 2004 is presented in the following table while the corresponding Proposed General Land Use Plan is shown on Figure 1.7.

Table 1.7 Breakdown of Proposed General Land Use, 2000 – 2004

Land Use Category

Area (has)

% to total City area

Built-up Areas

        2,500.00

10.15%

Agriculture/ SAFDZ

      14,992.00

60.84%

Forest/ Watershed

        3,956.00

16.06%

Grass Land/ Pastureland

                 -  

0.00%

Rivers/ Creeks

          150.00

0.61%

Roads

          450.00

1.83%

Remaining NPAAAD

        2,592.00

10.52%

Total

24,640.00

100.00%

Source: CLUP, 2000 - 2004

It should be noted that the main built-up area in the Central Unit is about 2,042 ha. representing 81.68 percent of the total.

 

Proposed Urban Land Use Plan, 2000 – 2004

The breakdown of previously proposed urban land uses is presented in the following table while the corresponding Proposed Urban Land Use Plan is shown on Figure 1.8.

Table 1.8 Breakdown of Proposed Urban Land Use, 2000 - 2004

Land Use Category

Area (has)

% to Total Urban Area

Residential

          190.00

14.97%

Commercial

            45.00

3.55%

Institutional

            11.00

0.87%

Industrial (Agro-industrial)

            40.00

3.15%

Parks & Playgrounds/ Open Space

              2.00

0.16%

Roads

            80.00

6.30%

Rivers/ Creeks

            60.00

4.73%

Agricultural

          836.10

65.89%

Special Use

              4.86

0.38%

Total

        1,268.96

100.00%

Source: CLUP, 2000 – 2004

 

 

 

 

 

 
Ligao City Development Partners